Mental Health Support for your school community – what we can do for you

We know that mental health and wellbeing is vital for young people. We also know that this can’t always happen without evidence based timely intervention. We know that educators do all they can to support mental health in young people and believe this can be even better if those educators have support in doing so.

We create bespoke mental health awareness packages for school communities.

Who we work with

We work with young people and their parents and carers. We work with groups of teachers, year leaders, senior leaders, student ambassadors, young leaders and governors. Essentially, we work with all stakeholders in schools to support good mental health and life-long self-care skills.

What this support looks like

The package is always individualised for schools. Here are a few examples:

  • We facilitate workshops on mental health and wellbeing designed for teachers at all levels, parents and carers, and young people. These workshops do not have to be ‘one-offs’ as this approach doesn’t always work for some school communities; instead we offer continued support to ensure the learning from these workshops can be consolidated, sustained and built into whole-school planning.
  • We support schools to create a Young Leaders/Student Ambassadors programme that equips pupils with the skills they need to create a culture where pupils can talk about mental health difficulties and reach out for the right support.
  • We support Heads of Year/Pastoral Leaders with the skills they need to be Pupil Advocates, supporting and promoting the mental health and wellbeing of the young people they work with.
  • We support with creating ‘Have Your Say’ forums where form/year group representatives attend to discuss mental health awareness and other matters important to them. (This in turn can be included for discussion at governors’ meetings, and can inform PSHE programmes).
  • We support school staff at all levels with strategies to take care of their own mental health and wellbeing, alongside that of the young people they work with, support and teach.

What this support feels like

These bespoke packages reaffirm networks in school communities. They improve communication between all stakeholders and ensure young people’s views on mental health are heard in the right forums – from senior team meetings, to year group meetings, to governors’ meetings. Support feels personal to the school community and creates a culture where everyone feels heard. Mental health awareness and wellbeing becomes part of the ‘language’ of the school, and, in turn, works to combat damaging stereotypes and stigma.

How this support can help with the bigger picture

We support schools with the establishment/development/sustainability of the whole school strategy for mental health and wellbeing. We also support schools to quality assure and develop their PHSE programmes for mental health and wellbeing.  Essentially, we start from where the school community starts and facilitate conversations and planning on what matters to them as a community. 

What Advent Advocacy will ask you to do

Just invite us to visit your school! Each programme of support is bespoke and so we like to talk to schools about their school community to find out what is already working well in terms of mental health awareness and wellbeing support and find out how things could be even better. We also like to visit the school to speak to staff and young people.

Our guiding principles

  • Unconditional positive regard for young people and the adults in their lives
  • Non-adversarial advocacy for mental health and wellbeing – we all want the same thing!
  • Empowering the adults who encounter young people with the confidence to build ‘soft skills’ for a better future
  • Signposting services that can help
  • Networks work! Everyone has their say and contributes to their community

How you can work with us:

You can email lindsey@adventadvocacy.co.uk. Or you could call our Northern office on 01325 776554. Please ask for Lindsey Martin.